Welcome to Our 2016 – 2017 Season

The new season for 2016-2017 has just been announced, and we’ve got quite an exciting line up as well as a new, updated look for the website.   To explore the concerts and events, click here.

To read the press release for this season, click here.

MMPAF’s New Partnership: Japan Society

Announcement

MMPAF, located at the crossroads of America’s most vibrant metropolis, is pleased to announce its partnership with the Japan Society.Founded in 1907, Japan Society (333 East 47th Street NY, NY) is the leading U.S. organization committed to deepening mutual understanding between the United States and Japan in a global context. Now in its second century, the Society serves audiences across the United States and abroad through innovative programs in arts and culture, public policy, business, language and education. Japan Society serves as a catalyst for the intellectual and cultural exchange that nurtures and sustains a healthy and productive relationship between the United States and Japan. Its Performing Arts Program is the leading showcase in the United States for contemporary and traditional Japanese dance, music and theater.

Since the inception of the Performing Arts Program in 1953, Japan Society has introduced more than 600 performing arts programs from Japan to an extensive American audience. In addition to its annual season of five to ten full-evening programs, ranging from the traditional arts of noh, kyogen, bunraku, and kabuki, to cutting-edge theater, dance and music, plus educational workshops, lectures and demonstrations, the Society has also been a pioneer in presenting works that are products of collaborations between Japanese and American/international artists. The Society presents established and emerging performers whose artistry strongly communicates an expression of Japanese tradition, art forms, or style. The Society also commissions new works to non-Japanese artists, produces national tours, organizes residency programs for American and Japanese artists and develops and presents educational programs.

Want to Know More? Click Here!

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Bach Tour 2012: Follow J.S. Bach’s Footsteps Through Germany

Bach Tour  Date  |  October 23 – 31, 2012

Follow J.S. Bach’s Footsteps through Germany

bach_sunglassesDid you know that Bach spent a month in jail during his tenure as Court Organist and Concertmaster to the Duke of Weimar. Turns out that, in 1717, Bach was offered and accepted a new position as Kappelmeister at the court of Cöthen. Bach appealed to the Duke for his release from the Weimar position, however the Duke refused and threw him in jail instead of allowing him to leave. Bach, of course, used this time productively and composed the “Orgelbüchlein,” a cycle of organ chorale preludes for the entire church year. The Duke finally came to his senses and Bach was allowed to take on his new position.

Join William Trafka, St. Bart’s Director of Music and Organist and the Artistic Director of MMPAF, as he leads a tour of the towns and cities where Bach thrived as a performer and composer. Hear the great organ works of Bach in the very buildings for which they were composed. Marvel at the charming towns such as Eisenach, Arnstadt and Mühlhausen in the luscious Thüringen region of Germany. Join, Co-Tour Director and German scholar, William Fulton as he brings puts these historic places into perspective with 18th century German culture. Discover the rich and varied life of one of history’s greatest composers as you walk in The Footsteps of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Photo Album |  Bach Tour
Photo Credits: Tim Martin

Conducting Bach in a 21st Century Urban Environment: A Case for Retreat

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It was the end of March and the Great Music series concert featuring Bach’s Magnificat and Easter Oratorio was just a few weeks down the road. My hope and dream for this concert was to capture the spirit and eloquence of this extraordinary music in a way that honors its historic importance but also resonates for the modern listener. But, I was concerned how I would properly prepare myself to conduct these works from a different era in a busy, noisy, distracting and at times overwhelming environment.

My first thought was that music never occurs in a vacuum; to try to remove oneself from the present in order to represent art from an earlier time is folly and essentially impossible. The first steps toward an historically informed performance had already been taken by inviting singers and instrumentalists who know, love and understand this style to participate in the performance. Also, the instruments to be used were copies of Baroque instruments which play at A=415 hz., exactly one-half step lower than A=440hz, the pitch used by modern orchestras.

I decided that I needed solitude and quiet to study and to open up myself to the musical possibilities of these two masterpieces. Through a friend, for three days I was given permission to use the choir room at St. Peter’s Methodist Church in Ocean City, NJ, a bustling summer resort on the Jersey shore but a very quiet place during early April. It was there that I discovered the wealth of musical imagery and nuance that Bach used in these works and how each movement becomes a separate painting in an art gallery depicting rich landscapes. I worked hard to hear individual lines and how they might be sung or played in a way to be clearly heard and shaped but fitting into the entire canvas. Most of all, I rediscovered the indisputable genius of Bach with his lucid sense of structure, unparalleled musical invention and heartfelt expressivity. I came away with a deeper sense of his great role in the history of Western civilization.

Did my stay by the ocean in this peaceful place affect the actual outcome of the performance? It certainly opened my mind and heart to the infinite ways of interpreting what Bach has written and allowed me time and focus to explore its many possibilities. I wouldn’t have spent those three days in any other way.